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What does E+TF stand for?

E+TF stands for endophyte-infected tall fescue

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In a study conducted in northwest Georgia, cows grazing novel endophyte infected tall fescue tended to have higher body condition scores and weights than cows that grazed toxic tall fescue. Steer and heifer calves grazing novel endophyte tall fescue also had approximately 50 and 60 pounds greater weaning weights, respectively, than their cohorts grazing toxic tall fescue (Figure 3). Unfortunately, cattle numbers were too small in this study to determine if reproductive characteristics were positively affected by the use of novel endophyte tall fescue.
It is now recognized that the presence of a toxic endophyte contributed to both the tough nature of KY31 and the poor performance of grazing animals in the warmer months. It is suspected that endophyte infected KY31 has been deleterious to wildlife as well. Today, there are many varieties of Tall Fescue that are low endophyte or endophyte free, which can be used for hay or pastures without any of the animal health concerns posed by endophyte infected KY31. Tall Fescue.
Total seasonal production of tall fescue is affected by weather, fertilizer (especially nitrogen), and cutting or grazing management. Yields of 2 to 4 tons of dry matter/acre are common, with the higher yields associated with proper fertilizer applications and harvest management. Endophytic Fungus in Tall Fescue Animal performance on tall fescue pastures has historically been inconsistent relative to other cool-season grasses. The cause of this inconsistent performance is attributed to an endophytic (endo = inside, phytic = the plant) fungus, Neotyphodium coenophialum, which is present in more than 85 percent of Kentucky's tall fescue pastures and hay fields. Endophyte-free tall fescue has been shown to provide better animal performance than endophyte-infected tall fescue.
Livestock Disorders of Endophyte-Infected Tall Fescue Fescue toxicosis, fescue foot, and fat necrosis are the three major disorders observed in cattle consuming tall fescue forage infected with the endophyte. Fescue foot is a dry, gangrenous condition that causes lameness or the loss of the tips of tails and/or ears, and in severe cases the sloughing of hooves or feet. These responses are due to restricted blood circulation to the extremities and occur most often in winter.
This amazing relationship reduces some types of herbivory, improves drought tolerance and generally bestows better fitness upon plants that are infected compared to those that are not. Buy why would people not want a high-yielding drought-resistant perennial grass to grow in their pastures or hayfields? Unfortunately, the most common endophyte produces alkaloid compounds that are toxic to ruminants and which can result in fever, fat necrosis, tail sloughing, abortion, and even foot sloughing. Many farmers in the ‘fescue belt’ of the U. S. have learned to live with endophyte infected tall fescue.
How have animals performed in Max Q grazing trials? The initial grazing trials at the Central Georgia Branch Station were done with lambs because the limited amount of seed available allowed only planting of small paddocks. Max Q with Jesup or Georgia 5, and endophyte-free Jesup furnished similar average gains, 0. 37 lb/day or nearly twice that of lambs on toxic endophyte-infected Jesup, 0. 22 lb/day, when grazed from March to June in 1998 and 1999. In autumn, grazing from October to December also resulted in superior daily gains on Max Q tall fescue as compared to that on endophyte-infected tall fescue.
It is now recognized that the presence of a toxic endophyte contributed to both the tough nature of KY31 and the poor performance of grazing animals in the warmer months. It is suspected that endophyte infected KY31 has been deleterious to wildlife as well. Today, there are many varieties of Tall Fescue that are low endophyte or endophyte free, which can be used for hay or pastures without any of the animal health concerns posed by endophyte infected KY31. Tall Fescue.