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What does WRAAC stand for?

WRAAC stands for Womens Royal Australian Army Corps

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The Women's Royal Australian Army Corps (WRAAC) was established in April 1951 to help overcome a manpower shortage. During the late 1970s female soldiers began to be integrated into the Army at large and in early 1985, the WRAAC was disbanded. The last Officers' Cadet School parade (6 December 1984) on the WRAAC School parade ground saw the Officer Cadets and the WRAAC Contingent marching to the strains of "Soldiers of the Queen".
The Women's Royal Australian Army Corps (WRAAC) was formed as an all women's corps of the Australian Army in April 1951 to counter a manpower shortage that developed due to fighting during the Korean War and post-World War II full employment. [1][2] At the time of its formation, many senior WRAAC personnel had previously served in the Australian Women's Army Service (AWAS), which had been raised during World War II, and as a result the WRAAC is considered to have its origins in the AWAS.
By 30 June 1947 all members of the AWAS had been demobilised (due to the end of the war). The Women's Royal Australian Army Corps (WRAAC) was formed in April 1951 to counter a manpower shortage that developed due to hostilities in the Korean Peninsular and post-World War II full employment. [5] At the time of its formation, many senior WRAAC personnel had previously served in the AWAS. [6] By the late 1970s female soldiers had begun to be integrated into the Army at large and in early 1985, the WRAAC was disbanded.
Yay! You're now following WOMENS ROYAL AUSTRALIAN ARMY CORPS.
" The AWAS was the only non-medical women's service to send personnel overseas during the war; in 1944 and 1945 AWAS served in both Dutch and Australian New Guinea. By 30 June 1947 all members of the AWAS had been demobilised. Facing a severe manpower shortage due to the demands of the Korean War and national service in a time of full employment, enlistment for the Women's Royal Australian Army Corps.
The Women's Royal Australian Army Corps (WRAAC) was established in April 1951 to help overcome a manpower shortage. During the late 1970s female soldiers began to be integrated into the Army at large and in early 1985, the WRAAC was disbanded. The last Officers' Cadet School parade (6 December 1984) on the WRAAC School parade ground saw the Officer Cadets and the WRAAC Contingent marching to the strains of "Soldiers of the Queen".
The Women's Royal Australian Army Corps (WRAAC) was formed as an all women's corps of the Australian Army in April 1951 to counter a manpower shortage that developed due to fighting during the Korean War and post-World War II full employment. [1][2] At the time of its formation, many senior WRAAC personnel had previously served in the Australian Women's Army Service (AWAS), which had been raised during World War II, and as a result the WRAAC is considered to have its origins in the AWAS.
As I wander the internet searching for items relevant to my life in The Women's Royal Australian Army Corps way back in the 1960s, I'm acutely aware of the lack of sites where ex-WRAAC can catch up with old friends; leave messages; and generally wallow in a bit of nostalgia. There are a couple of excellent sites which exist already. but they don't allow for posting of comments by visitors to the site.