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What does IPPEC stand for?

IPPEC stands for International Piano Performance Examinations Committee

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The International Piano Performance Examinations Committee (IPPEC) exists to provide a graded system of examinations in music, based in Taiwan, by providing not only quality music examinations, but also educative services to the teachers, students and music learners. IPPEC has worked very hard to gather all the useful educational information and resources for our music data bank in order to help students and teachers to achieve their goals in music studies.
[29] His musical career includes being a concert pianist and collaborative artist, a professor and an international juror. From 2007 until 2010, he served as president to the USC chapter of the MTNA at the USC Thornton School of Music in Los Angeles. [30] In 2010, Latso served as chairman for the International Piano Performance Examination Committee in Taiwan, (Republic of China). [31] He has taught at the University of Southern California, Azusa Pacific University, at Glendale Community College.
Casarotti will join the International Piano Performance Examinations Committee.
Leslie Spotz, assistant professor of piano at Tarleton State University, was recently awarded the opportunity to travel to Taiwan as a result of being named an ?Internationally Recognized Piano Teacher? by the International Piano Performance Examinations Committee (IPPEC) of Taiwan. While in Taiwan, Spotz will evaluate approximately 1,300 piano students (grades K-12) and teach seminars to about 500 to 600 piano teachers.
Spotz is an "internationally recognized pianist" by the International Piano Performance Examinations Committee.
Southern University Baton Rouge's music professor Joao Casarotti has been chosen to be one of two judges to be part of an international piano evaluation committee in Taiwan this summer. Casarotti will join the International Piano Performance Examinations Committee (IPPEC) to travel through Taiwan evaluating around 1,200 pianists, ranging from age five to 25. Every year IPPEC selects two judges from important music institutions around the world to evaluate Taiwanese piano students and talk with students, parents, and teachers.
His professional training includes studies at Rice University, The Cleveland Institute of Music and Santa Clara University. His performances on Spanish-speaking radio broadcasts have aired throughout South and Central America, and he has collaborated with members of the Houston Symphony, New World Symphony and the Cleveland Orchestra. As an adjudicator and clinician, Ruiz has judged piano competitions and festivals in Texas and California and has given concerts and master classes at the Franz Liszt Conservatory in Quito, Ecuador. He was invited back to judge the First Annual National Piano competition in Ecuador. He has also served as an examiner for the International Piano Performance Examinations Committee.