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ABC stands for And the Bougainville Crisis

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For a really edifying account of the crisis you could try Alexander Downer's "The Bougainville Crisis: An Australian Perspective". There are hundreds of remaindered copies around. It contains the full whitewash.
For the Australian government, the Bougainville crisis raised a number of concerns (see Lasslett 2012). However, Australia’s greatest fear was that the uprising would cause PNG’s fragile state apparatus to crack. In which case the safety of expatriates and the security of Australian investments (which stood at around $A1. 8 billion), would be put in peril. While more broadly, the collapse of the PNG state would seriously damage Australia’s regional leadership aspirations, and provoke uncomfortable questions from important allies (principally the United States and Indonesia).
Ogan, E. (1991). The cultural background to the Bougainville crisis. Journal de la Societe des Oceanistes 92-93:1-2, pp 61-67.
Other researchers pointed out that even though journalists got into Bougainville during the crisis, the coverage was uneven (Cronau, 1994; Denoon & Spriggs, 1992). Dorney argues that, with few exceptions, the Australian media pays scant attention to Australia's former colony unless there is high drama, such as during the Sandline crisis in March 1997, or a disaster relief effort, such as when the Australian Defence Force played a high-profile role during the drought induced famine of 1997–98 (1998, p15).
[12] Five members of the ADF on loan or exchange with the PNGDF are reported to have visited Bougainville during the crisis.
It included a wide range of women, many of whom were not usually politically active. Later in 1995, the BICWF began to organise for a Women's Peace Forum which was subsequently held in Arawa in August 1996. About 700 women met to discuss how they could move towards a united front and find lasting solutions to the Bougainville Crisis. Women from the three main-line churches and from across the island participated at the Forum.
When the mine closed in 1989, few people expected that the Bougainville crisis would be protracted. However early attempts to broker a peace agreement failed and, despite short-lived ceasefires, significant cycles of violence continued until October 1997 when peace talks resulted in a truce.